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San Andres, Quezon: Where The Heck Is Alibijaban Island?

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove

Alibijaban. Say that again – A-li-bi-ha-ban. Pronouncing its tongue-twisting name is a struggle as going to this remote island. It involves an 8-hour land journey to the far reaches of Bondoc Peninsula in a town called San Andres, which is surprisingly within Quezon Province despite the long hours on the road. Dirt roads, zigzag roads, roads in the middle of nowhere – it seems endless. But if the off-beaten track to lesser-known beach destinations is what you seek, Alibijaban Island will not disappoint.

To yield to Alibijaban’s peculiar charm is not difficult. The island is a small fishing village dominated by mangrove trees than the fishing folk in terms of population. Except for the melodic brushes of the sea and the gentle bristles of the leaves, Alibijaban is mainly quiet. It is serene as it is picturesque. Cool shades of blue stretching from sea to sky invigorates the eyes even on the warmest summer days. White sand sprawls in patches of beaches and sandbars around the island. Each particle glitters to the sun’s light like microscopic crystals by day and collectively, they reflect the luminance of a bright moonlit night. Remote, pleasant, peaceful – Alibjaban spells an idyllic vacationt for the intrepid staying off the grid.

By the end of this post, you probably won’t still be able to pronounce Alibijaban with suave. But that’s fine. Let the island spell paradise on its own. Or perhaps let your awesome experiences here carve the island’s name in your mind and hearts instead. Because one thing is for certain – falling in love with this quaint island is a thousand times easier than saying its name.

Say it one last time – Alibijaban. See? It’s difficult.

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove sunrise

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove

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Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangroves

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach camping

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach camping

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach camping tent

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach mangrove

Alibijaban Island San Andres Quezon beach sandbar

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1.Directions to Alibijaban Island: Superlines have direct bus from Cubao, Quezon City to San Andres, Quezon Province. Travel time is approximately 8 hours. Fare costs somewhere around P450.00 to P500.00. You could also take a bus to Lucena then ride a van to San Andres.

2. Hire boats in San Andres Port that will take you to Alibijaban Island.

3. You could buy supplies at San Andres Market. There are also small eateries where you can take breakfast.

4. Bring your camping gears in the island. There are cottages available for rent as well.

5. There are comfort rooms in the campsites. Water, however, is a bit scarce.

6. Or you could skip all the hassle and book a trip with Biyahe Lokal.

7. More about Quezon Province

8. Like Biyaherong Barat on Facebook..

9. Follow @BiyaherongBarat on Twitter

10. Follow @biyaherongbarat on Instagram.

11. Enjoy your trip and be safe

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Alibijaban Biyahe Lokal

Alibijaban Island Biyahe Lokal

 

 

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13 thoughts on “San Andres, Quezon: Where The Heck Is Alibijaban Island?

  1. Pingback: San Andres, Quezon: Where The Heck Is Alibijaban Island? - Amazon Philippines Review

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